• Extra virgin olive oil of Canino

    Almost one hundred years of olive oil production

    more


  • Extra virgin olive oil of Canino

    Almost one hundred years of olive oil production

    more


  • Extra virgin olive oil of Canino

    Almost one hundred years of olive oil production

    more


  • Extra virgin olive oil of Canino

    Almost one hundred years of olive oil production

    more



Home / The olive mill: Olive oil extraction

OLIVE FARM ARCHIBUSACCI g&F: Olive oil extraction

There are two different mechanical methods for extracting oil from olives.
The first is the same that was used since ancient times. Olives are crushed with large granite millstones (coming from England), followed by the extraction of oil through pressure. The other, more modern, uses mechanical crushers with metal hammers to obtain the paste of crushed olives.

What are the differences between these two mehods?
These are the two most common methods of olive oil extraction
GRINDING STONES AND PRESSURE (THE CLASSIC, OR TRADITIONAL METHOD).
CONTINUOUS CYCLE (MODERN, OR CENTRIFUGAL, METHOD).


THE TRADITIONAL METHOD
Olives are leaves removed, washed and then crushed by large granite wheels. The soft pressure of the millstones, which rotate very slowly, allows to obtain a paste of crushed olives between 13 and 18 degrees centigrade. The paste thus obtained is stirred at a higher temperature, in order to facilitate the extraction of olive oil.
The paste is then placed on discs of nylon, that are stacked on carts to compose a sort of tower, which is subsequently put under the press. The press, through hydraulic pressure, separates the liquid portion from the solid one (residue). The residue is sent to processors, that extract the remainder of the olive oil using chemical solvents. Subsequently, the woody part of the core is further separated from the dusty part and used as fuel for boilers. The must, consisting of oil and vegetation water, is then conveyed to a final separator that separates olive oil from water and other impurities by centrifugal force. The olive oil is then cleaned from remaining impurities through natural filtration (on cotton). This olive oil is referred to as "COLD PRESSED".
THE GREATER LIMIT OF THIS SYSTEM IS ITS EXTREMELY COMPLEX MANAGEMENT.
THE CONTINUOUS CYCLE The name of this method derives from the fact that it consists of a combination of machines, connected in continuity between them, excluding any interruption in processing.

The machines connected to each other are four:
The mill;
The crusher;
The decanter; The separator.
In the oil mill, olives are reduced to a paste and yet at this stage there is a first, though partial, extraction of olive oil. The paste and the first olive oil pass through the crusher, which will recover all the oil still trapped in the paste. The crusher is a long and narrow tank with a central axis fitted with kneading blades in continuous rotation. The movement of the blades facilitates the rupture of small bags in the paste, which still retain oil. The crusher is maintained at a constant temperature with a system similar to a radiator. The paste, which at this stage is diluted with water, passes into a spin-dryer called decanter.

This spin-dryer discards the residue, due to different specific weight. The separator then conveys in different directions the water (that has been introduced into the decanter), the vegetation water (coming from olives) and the olive oil.

In the continuous cycle, the extraction is therefore entrusted to the decanter, a horizontal spin-dryer.

This olive oil is referred to as "COLD PRODUCED", because, during the production, temperature does not exceed 27C. This system combines the efficiency, hygiene and purity of the olive oil, enhancing its full-bodied and fruity aroma. It also improves its preservation because polyphenols, excellent natural antioxidants, are not dispersed in the wastewater. The olive oil is then cleaned from the remaining impurities through natural filtration (on cotton).

The kneading process allows the formation of substances that make up the flavour of the olive oil. Without kneading one would obtain a flat olive oil, almost without any organoleptic properties. It is therefore a necessary and extremely delicate step, that must be well managed. Otherwise it can affect the olive oil, inducing:

a) the infiltration of substances between water and oil;
b) the activation of the oxidation process (ranciditing).

This affects the organoleptic quality of the product. It derives that the timing and conditions of grinding and mixing are not standard, but must be evaluated on the degree of maturation and the state of olives. In recent times conservation under liquid nitrogen has been adopted, which avoids direct contact with the air, keeping unchanged the quality of the olive oil. Without the help of the temperature, olive oils would be much less aromatic, almost flat to the taste and smell.

It can be concluded that if the cultivar of origin are qualitatively good and in good health, if olives are in good condition, if the healthy olives (and not those that have fallen on the ground) are harvested at the optimum time (generally after October 20), if they are preserved and pressed on time and the right way (within 24/48 hours of collection), if the method used (traditional or continuous) is operated at a temperature below 27 C, if (with the traditional method) strainings are new, well kept and clean, the product quality will be unquestioned. But quality obviously comes at a cost. Part of this cost is due to a decrease in the olive oil yield per ton of olives, the other part is due to costs of organization and manpower, that inevitably increase, if you want to do quick and well.




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Frantoio Archibusacci F&C sas di Simona Archibusacci & C. | P.I. 02020900565 | Via del Boschetto, 3 - 01011 Canino (VT) - Italy
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